Melissa Leong

Celebrating The Lunar New Year With The Star

Published: The Star Magazine February 2019

Published: The Star Magazine February 2019

It’s the year of the pig, if you follow the Chinese zodiac. What does it mean? Just like those juicy, sweet little porcine beauties, the year is set to be prosperous one, full of fortune and luck. Along with the very fabulous Dami Im, I spoke to journalist Penny Carroll about what symbolic foods you should have on the table during the Lunar New Year to encourage good health, longevity and prosperity.

Dami Im The Star Interview Lunar New Year

TV host says Sandra Oh’s Golden Globes victory gives her hope for greater representation in Aussie media

Published on Draw Your Box, January 7, 2019

Published on Draw Your Box, January 7, 2019

Pop culture may seem trivial but then again, so much in this world is right now. So we take the good where we can get it, and today that came in the form of the incredible Canadian actor Sandra Oh, not only hosting the Golden Globe Awards, but winning Best Female TV Actor. In doing so, she became the first Asian woman in 38 years to win the award.

Months ago when the film adaptation of the book Crazy Rich Asians was released, I wondered why it hit me so emotionally to see female lead Constance Wu on the cover of Time Magazine. Then I read an interview with Sandra Oh by The Hollywood Reporter and it all made sense.

“Just speaking for my own community, people cried a lot in [‘Crazy Rich Asians’], and it’s not only because it’s a great story and a classic romantic comedy — it is  because seeing yourself reflected onscreen is really emotional when you don’t even know that you’re carrying so much grief of never  being seen.”

To be seen, regardless of who you are, is to matter. Oh’s words resonate with so many because we all need to feel like the space we take up in this world means something. This conversation we’ve been having in popular culture about diversity isn’t a novelty to ping ratings, or to push an agenda. It’s a far-to-late one, highlighting the need to represent our world for who we are. All of us. Every face, race and perspective.

Thank you to the fabulous website Draw Your Box, for pushing the conversation forward for women of colour, and for mentioning my little social media fist pump on the Divine Lady Oh’s many reasons to celebrate right now in this moment.

Click here to read the article in full.

Sandra Oh made history today when she not only became the first Asian host of the Golden Globes, but also the first Asian woman to win Golden Globes in multiple categories.

The 47-year-old star scored the gong for Best Performance By An Actress in a Television Series — Drama  for her stellar performance in Killing Eve, and her win had quite the impact on other Asian women across the globe as social media has shown.

Melissa Leong,  host of SBS’ The Chef’s Line, praised Sandra’s victory and highlighted the importance of greater representation on screen in not only Hollywood, but the Australian TV and film industry.

“Each win like Sandra Oh’s night at The Golden Globes is not only a win for extremely hard earned talent, but in some way, for everyone who feels seen in that public acknowledgement,” wrote the Singaporean-Chinese presenter.

“It gives me hope that Australia will one day catch up and represent us publicly in a more honest and accurate way…because we are STILL so far from being there yet.”

As host of the Golden Globes, Sandra had the opportunity to pay tribute to films such as Crazy Rich Asians, Black Panther and BlacKkKlansman that have changed Hollywood’s landscape this year.

She also acknowledged her greater involvement in the awards show playing a part in making change.

“I said yes to the fear of being on this stage tonight because I wanted to be here to look out into this audience and witness this moment of change,” she emotionally admitted

“Next year could be different … but right now, this moment is real. Trust me, it is real.”

Congrats Sandra on a very well deserved win.

Sunday Life: My Day On A Plate

Published Sunday Life, Sydney Morning Herald, September 23, 2018

Published Sunday Life, Sydney Morning Herald, September 23, 2018

For as long as I’ve read the paper, I’ve loved reading My Day On A Plate in Sunday Life. Such fascinating insight into what people eat and do…well, I’m pretty thrilled to have had my very own day on a plate published, a dream come true! These things are hard to write for me, what I eat varies wildly from day to day, so I wrote it based on the day I was asked to write it. Read more below.

8.30am

After hosting a dinner event with Peter Gilmore at Sydney's Quay last night, I wake up realising I probably won't be eating anything [nearly as] fancy today.

10.30am Craving noodles for breakfast, I head to Chinatown for a bowl of khao dtom sen: chewy Thai rice noodles swimming in steamy pork bone broth, topped with soft pork ribs, chilli oil, Thai basil, bean sprouts and lime. [NB: For those playing, I went to Boon Cafe]

2.30pm A protein bar on the flight to Melbourne; nobody wants a hangry Mel.

5.30pm Back in Melbourne, I have two corn thins topped with avocado, chilli, salt and lemon before heading to Pilates, where I might very well die.

7.30pm Didn't die, hooray. Taste-testing recipes to cook on breakfast TV next week. I decide on Hainanese chicken with smashed radish and cucumber salad. Two glasses of wine are obviously crucial to this "testing process".

9.30pm Current obsession: crumbles. A cup of frozen berries, topped with a crumble made from a little almond meal, butter, cinnamon, salt and nutmeg, thrown in the oven for 20 minutes. Served with a spoonful of Greek yoghurt.

Dr Joanna McMillan says: 

Top marks for … Your wonderful Thai soup breakfast. This gave you vegies, carbs to fuel your day, protein to rein in your appetite. As a bonus, the fluid aids in hydration.

If you keep eating like this you'll … Fall short on the antioxidants, other beneficial chemicals and fibre types we get from plant foods. You also failed to meet the daily recommendation of two serves of fruit and five of vegies, and had no wholegrains or legumes to boost fibre.

Why don't you try … Getting some leafy greens into your everyday diet. Pick up an apple or other fruit in the airport lounge while travelling and include beans, chickpeas or lentils a few times a week – they work beautifully in a salad or soup.

Catch Melissa on The Chefs' Line at 6pm weeknights on SBS. Episodes are also available via SBS On Demand. 

This article appears in Sunday Life magazine within the Sun-Herald and the Sunday Age on sale September 23.

Some Like It Hot

"Hello Melissa? I'd like to challenge you to a ramen eating contest." Umm....HELL YES! A few weeks ago, Andy Trieu, host of SBS Pop Asia called and asked me if eating contests were my thing. Personally, I'm often fascinated by the culture of why we love to watch people put themselves through that kind of duress (more on this by me here), so I decided to put my money where my mouth is, and for the sake of journalistic research (also, ramen), and say YES! 

The results, you can see for yourself. Suffice to say that eating a tonne of chilli comes with a tonne of consequences, so please follow my example at your own risk!